mathhombre:

From Shouldn’t We Teach GEOMETRY?, Branko Grunbaum, The Two-Year College Mathematics Journal, Vol. 12, No. 4 (Sep., 1981), pp. 232-238 
I will read anything by Grunbaum.

mathhombre:

From Shouldn’t We Teach GEOMETRY?, Branko Grunbaum, The Two-Year College Mathematics Journal, Vol. 12, No. 4 (Sep., 1981), pp. 232-238 

I will read anything by Grunbaum.

(via proofmathisbeautiful)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 349 notes. .

mrvelocipede:

Knitting + fractal. It seems like it should be an April Fools joke, but it’s not.

Sierpinski Gasket shawl, knitted in Zitron Filisilk. About 60” across the top edge. Somewhat wrinkled from being folded and then sitting around for a while.

(via leviathanteacups)

This was posted 3 weeks ago. It has 1,132 notes.

Berry’s paradox

curiosamathematica:

We can classify the integers based on the smallest number of syllables in English necessary to describe them. For example, 6 could be described in one syllable as “six,” while 729 could be described in two syllables as “nine cubed.”

Since there are only a finite number of words in the English language, only a finite (although very large) number of numbers can be described with a given number of syllables. Specifically, for the purpose of this argument, only a finite number of positive integers can be described using 18 or fewer syllables. Therefore, there must be a least integer not describable using less than 19 syllables.

Now, consider the set of all positive integers that require at least 19 syllables to describe them. This set will have a smallest element. However, we can describe this integer as the “least integer not describable using less than nineteen syllables”, which is a description of 18 syllables!

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 75 notes.

the-mathematical-poet:

Klein Bottle

(via visualizingmath)

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 888 notes.

nicconoh:

Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music." | Betrand Russell
"Beauty of Mathematics" by Yann Pineill & Nicolas Lefaucheux

This was posted 4 months ago. It has 47,483 notes.
fuckyeahtheuniverse:

Dimensions in Physics

fuckyeahtheuniverse:

Dimensions in Physics

(Source: theyvcreation)

This was posted 4 months ago. It has 50,445 notes. .

(Source: minimalmathconcepts, via visualizingmath)

This was posted 5 months ago. It has 676 notes. .

In case anyone wants a copy, here’s Numerical Mathematics and Computing, 6th ed. as a free pdf.

This was posted 7 months ago. It has 1 note.

cultivatevision:

Series of posters created for the love of math, nature, art, and education.

Prints available: http://meganemoore.storenvy.com/

This was posted 7 months ago. It has 14,040 notes.

visualizingmath:

Views of the Tesseract Poster by theFOUNDRY. A tesseract is the four-dimensional analog of the cube; the tesseract is to the cube as the cube is to the square. Just as the surface of the cube consists of 6 square faces, the hypersurface of the tesseract consists of 8 cubical cells.

This was posted 8 months ago. It has 152 notes.