curiosamathematica:

The Google trend for the search query “quadratic formula”.
It repeats in the same pattern every year. Down in summer, up in September, down again in December and up again in spring time before going down again in the summer. And so it goes on forever.

curiosamathematica:

The Google trend for the search query “quadratic formula”.

It repeats in the same pattern every year. Down in summer, up in September, down again in December and up again in spring time before going down again in the summer. And so it goes on forever.

(via threewaystopcock)

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 68,635 notes. .
d3lt4:

"Fibonacci Sequence #3" Art print
Leonardo Fibonacci is an Italian mathematician from the 12th century.

d3lt4:

"Fibonacci Sequence #3" Art print

Leonardo Fibonacci is an Italian mathematician from the 12th century.

(via visualizingmath)

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 877 notes. .

Hand drawn hypercube animation.

Hand drawn hypercube animation.

(Source: dominicewan, via curiosamathematica)

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 4,050 notes. .

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Bhāskarāchārya

[x], [x]

Bhāskarāchārya / Bhāskara II (1114–1185) was an Indian mathematician and astronomer.

Among his many achievements are the following:

1. He was the first person to explain that when you divide by zero, the result is infinity.

2. He was also the first person to note that a positive number has two square roots - a positive and a negative one.

3. He described the principles of differential calculus 500 years before Leibniz and Newton. (He definitively came up with Rolle’s theorem half a millennium before Rolle himself.)

4. He calculated the length of the rotation of the earth around the sun to 365.2588 days - he was just off by 3 minutes.

Intriguingly, his treatise on arithmetic and geometry, Līlāvatī, is named after his daughter. He addresses her as an eager student:

Oh Līlāvatī, intelligent girl, if you understand addition and subtraction, tell me the sum of the amounts 2, 5, 32, 193, 18, 10, and 100, as well as [the remainder of] those when subtracted from 10000.” and “Fawn-eyed child Līlāvatī, tell me, how much is the number [resulting from] 135 multiplied by 12, if you understand multiplication by separate parts and by separate digits. And tell [me], beautiful one, how much is that product divided by the same multiplier?

These invocations have led some to surmise that Līlāvatī, too, was a mathematician.

Image from here: http://mathdept.ucr.edu/pdf/iwm1.pdf

Story of her introduction to math here: http://4go10tales.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/lilavati.html

Wikipedia on Bhaskaracharya

This was posted 3 weeks ago. It has 2,065 notes.
mathhombre:

From Shouldn’t We Teach GEOMETRY?, Branko Grunbaum, The Two-Year College Mathematics Journal, Vol. 12, No. 4 (Sep., 1981), pp. 232-238 
I will read anything by Grunbaum.

mathhombre:

From Shouldn’t We Teach GEOMETRY?, Branko Grunbaum, The Two-Year College Mathematics Journal, Vol. 12, No. 4 (Sep., 1981), pp. 232-238 

I will read anything by Grunbaum.

(via proofmathisbeautiful)

This was posted 4 months ago. It has 367 notes. .

mrvelocipede:

Knitting + fractal. It seems like it should be an April Fools joke, but it’s not.

Sierpinski Gasket shawl, knitted in Zitron Filisilk. About 60” across the top edge. Somewhat wrinkled from being folded and then sitting around for a while.

(via leviathanteacups)

This was posted 5 months ago. It has 1,191 notes.

Berry’s paradox

curiosamathematica:

We can classify the integers based on the smallest number of syllables in English necessary to describe them. For example, 6 could be described in one syllable as “six,” while 729 could be described in two syllables as “nine cubed.”

Since there are only a finite number of words in the English language, only a finite (although very large) number of numbers can be described with a given number of syllables. Specifically, for the purpose of this argument, only a finite number of positive integers can be described using 18 or fewer syllables. Therefore, there must be a least integer not describable using less than 19 syllables.

Now, consider the set of all positive integers that require at least 19 syllables to describe them. This set will have a smallest element. However, we can describe this integer as the “least integer not describable using less than nineteen syllables”, which is a description of 18 syllables!

This was posted 5 months ago. It has 76 notes.

the-mathematical-poet:

Klein Bottle

(via visualizingmath)

This was posted 5 months ago. It has 930 notes.

nicconoh:

Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music." | Betrand Russell
"Beauty of Mathematics" by Yann Pineill & Nicolas Lefaucheux

This was posted 8 months ago. It has 49,374 notes.
fuckyeahtheuniverse:

Dimensions in Physics

fuckyeahtheuniverse:

Dimensions in Physics

(Source: theyvcreation)

This was posted 9 months ago. It has 50,693 notes. .